Pests and diseases

Fruit fly management for vegetable growers

Fruit fly management for vegetable growers

Fruit flies are recognised as one of the world’s most serious pests for horticulture. They can breed rapidly, disperse widely and successfully infest most fruit and fruiting vegetables. The larvae not only destroy infested fruit, but are a major quarantine issue for both domestic and international markets. See five new videos that will explain how to manage fruit flies, and also the new Fruit fly management for vegetable growers handbook, both outputs of the project.

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Carrots

A new multi-faceted approach to soil-borne disease management in vegetables

This new project will provide Australian vegetable growers with the tools and solutions they need to manage the risk of crop losses due to soil-borne disease in the major vegetable growing regions in Australia. The multidisciplinary team that created the …

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Brassica whitefly control in vegetables

Brassica whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella) is a pest of crops in the brassica family. This insect is not restricted to brassicas, although it prefers them. Its host range includes cabbages, cauliflowers, broccoli, kale and Asian vegetables, especially wombok (Chinese cabbage). In …

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AHR Booth_3

AHR at the National Horticulture Convention and Field Day

AHR staff were thrilled to be part of the National Horticulture Convention on the Gold Coast last week. The popular stand featured both the Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection projects, where 100s of fact sheets, UBSs, Pest and Disease …

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A disease-free product is easier to market, and one which brings a premium price to the grower. The difference is significant between healthy leeks grown in healthy soil following a biofumigant cover crop (at left) and (at right) a less-than-optimum result – control crop of leeks where no cover crop was grown.

Soil diseases in vegetables under attack in new project

Link to ABC Rural story and interview Soil-borne diseases are a major threat to vegetable produce in intensive cropping systems, costing Australia’s $4 billion vegetable industry around $120 million per annum, while management has become more difficult with fewer chemical …

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